Passion or Profession? A Constant Confusion

Passion or Profession? A Constant Confusion

Sayan Dey | Feb 04, 2019

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College life: that very traditional and universal axiom assumed in this period of GROWTH: ‘Go with the flow’. The habit of purchasing and consuming readymade or prescribed decisions that we have been practising since a long past, marked by the evolution of a modern world to get rid of the rigorous flowchart of arriving at the conclusion, and at last converging into the single ‘goal’ of life: a settled life in a ‘respectful’ position in the society.

In today’s life of din and bustle, and brutal competition, the small child’s crazy dream often gets lost amidst the smog of expectations and fear of failure. We shut up our dreams, fill up the forms and reach our destination where we ‘should’ get a job at the end of our course and that would secure our insecure future. 

A statistics based on the data collected by University of Montreal and Canadian Census data 2016 says:  More than the 3/4th of the surveyed students have a passion of sports, art, music but only a 1/20th of them succeed to turn them into a profession.

When we delve deeper into the issue, we must find the inability to market skills as the greatest cause behind failure in turning passion into a profession. Another very common cause is that the need for ensuring financial security often takes over the love for our passion. These two reasons being intense instances in the context of India serve a great hand in bringing catastrophic results. Unemployment and instances of suicide among students in this regard are very concerning.

Well, the scenario perhaps has taken a turn towards the East with a new trend of ‘Passion and Profession’ rather than ‘Passion vs Profession’. People are learning to adapt to the hostility and trying to get the best out of it. The unprecedented access to a humongous library of information through the internet is serving in training the learners without lesser hindrances. The lack of learning support is no more an excuse for abandoning one’s passion. People are creating examples going out of the stream in their field of interest proving the traditional path of success to be optional but belief in one’s instincts and interest as mandatory.

Team MM took an effort to assess the situation in the campus of NIT Rourkela and undertook a survey among people, and the outcome was somewhat like this. It undoubtedly takes a lot of effort to get into an institute like NIT Rourkela, yet a significant amount of responses show that they remain unsatisfied or in a neutral mode of interest into their academics. They are actually compromising with their self-ambition and prioritizing degrees and career opportunities in a field they are hardly or mildly interested in, as the outcomes of the survey said.

 

 

A sparrow in the fist is better than a pigeon on the roof, it’s always better to have a degree and then pursue your career’. This adage is perhaps killing the best of possibilities. Youngsters are giving in to their constraints and choosing what they certainly do not want or are unaware of. But is there really no way out of it? No, definitely there are some. It’s just confidence and belief that we are losing on when it comes to pursuing interests. It seeks more zeal, perseverance, dedication, and courage that will ultimately defeat the barricades put onto us. Profession and passion can walk side by side. Passion is the key to success in profession and love for work. It is what creates an unconditional interest to work and enjoy it simultaneously. Otherwise, we would not have the likes of Einstein, Sundar Pichai, Bill Gates, and Walt Disney.

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